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•In 1992, Congress mandated a pilot demonstration of Energy Efficient Mortgages (EEMs) in five states. In 1995, the pilot was expanded as a national program.


•EEMs recognize that reduced utility expenses can permit a homeowner to pay a higher mortgage to cover the cost of the energy improvements on top of the approved mortgage. FHA EEMs provide mortgage insurance for a person to purchase or refinance a principal residence and incorporate the cost of energy efficient improvements into the mortgage. The borrower does not have to qualify for the additional money and does not make a down payment on it. The mortgage loan is funded by a lending institution, such as a mortgage company, bank, or savings and loan association, and the mortgage is insured by HUD. FHA insures loans. FHA does not provide loans.

Purpose: 
The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) makes it easier for consumers to obtain affordable home improvement loans by insuring loans made by private lenders to improve properties that meet certain requirements. "Lending institutions make loans from their own funds to eligible borrowers to finance these improvements."

Type of Assistance: 
The Title I program insures loans to finance the light or moderate rehabilitation of properties, as well as the construction of nonresidential buildings on the property. This program may be used to insure such loans for up to 20 years on either single- or multifamily properties. The maximum loan amount is $25,000 for improving a single-family home or for improving or building a nonresidential structure.

For improving a multifamily structure, the maximum loan amount is $12,000 per family unit, not to exceed a total of $60,000 for the structure. These are fixed-rate loans, for which lenders charge interest at market rates. The interest rates are not subsidized by HUD, although some communities participate in local housing rehabilitation programs that provide reduced-rate property improvement loans through Title I lenders.

FHA insures private lenders against the risk of default for up to 90 percent of any single loan. The annual premium for this insurance is $1 per $100 of the amount advanced; although this fee may be charged to the borrower separately, it is sometimes covered by a higher interest charge.

Property Improvement Loan Insurance 

​​Energy Efficient Mortgage Program

FHA's Energy Efficient Mortgage program (EEM) helps homebuyers or homeowners save money on utility bills by enabling them to finance the cost of adding energy efficiency features to new or existing housing as part of their FHA insured home purchase or refinancing mortgage.

Eligible Lenders: 
Only lenders approved by HUD specifically for this program can make loans covered by Title I insurance. Title I loans can be disbursed directly to the borrower or, if the loan is made through a dealer, the disbursement will be made jointly to the dealer and the borrower. While most lenders and dealers/contractors use this program responsibly, HUD urges consumers to use caution in choosing and supervising home repair dealers/contractors conducting Title I repair/renovation work.

Eligible Customers: 
Eligible borrowers include the owner of the property to be improved, the person leasing the property (provided that the lease will extend at least 6 months beyond the date when the loan must be repaid), or someone purchasing the property under a land installment contract.

Eligible Activities: 
Title I loans may be used to finance permanent property improvements that protect or improve the basic livability or utility of the property--including manufactured homes, single-family and multifamily homes, nonresidential structures, and the preservation of historic homes. The loans can also be used for fire safety equipment.

Application: 
Applications must be submitted to a Title I approved lender. Search for a HUD-approved lender online.

Technical Guidance: 

This program is authorized under Title I, Section 2, of the National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1703). Program regulations are in 24 CFR Part 201. The program is administered by HUD's Office of Housing-Federal Housing Administration (FHA).